Verolution

This film looks legit. #latism 

"In response to your recent CNN articles, I am 100% against everything you stand for…I don’t respect illegals, and I certainly want our president, weak as he may be, to continue to deport each and every illegal and every child of every illegal. Drivers licenses and tuition for illegals?!…You’re in MY country. Adapt. If you want respect, adapt to OUR ways…" - Lawrence F.

I’m always amazed when I see comments like these. People are pretty worked up over the growth of the Latino community and the role that immigration played in fueling it. Many of them can talk your ear off about that. And yet, not many of them seem to know any flesh-and-blood Latinos. If they did, they would know how ridiculous it is to treat U.S. citizens and illegal immigrants as if they are one and the same. Besides, they seem to put a lot of stock in what it means to be an American. So shouldn’t they be able to recognize Americans when they see them?

There is some good news, though. Some readers figured out the difference between U.S Latino citizens and illegal immigrants and tried to explain it to others:

"Just for the record, not every Latino in America is illegal. Please stop combining us with the minority that came here illegally. I’m sick of being told off for ‘being illegal’ just because I’m Hispanic. My family has been here since the 1600s thank you very much. Longer than most people’s families that tell me to ‘go back to Mexico.’ Ironic isn’t it?" - Iblink

Ah, yes. Go back to Mexico. In the 20 years that I’ve written about immigration, I’ve been told that hundreds of times. I don’t suppose it has anything to do with being Mexican-American?

Apparently, I’m not the only one hearing it. Someone has even taken the experience and put it to music. The result is a profound and provocative song called “Somos Mas Americanos" from one of my favorite Mexican bands, Los Tigres del Norte. It goes like this:

"They have shouted at me a thousand times that I should go back to my country…Because there’s no room for me here…

I want to remind the gringos: I didn’t cross the border, the border crossed me…

And they can call me “invader.” That’s a very frequent mistake…

If we take into account centuries…even if it bothers our neighbors …We are more American.. Than all of the gringos…”

Noting that “America” is actually made up of three continents and not just one, the lyrics declare that — in reality — Mexicans have been “Americans” longer than the descendants of European immigrants. In that sense, Mexican immigrants to the United States are more American than the folks trying to keep them out.

So there. If that sounds harsh, then so be it. A song like this is born of anger, frustration and righteous indignation. Imagine being treated like a second-class citizen on your own home turf.

It does get tiresome. I was born in the United States. The same goes for my parents, three grandparents, and half of my great-grandparents. And I’m supposed to “go back to Mexico”?

What? You mean on vacation? Great idea. Puerto Vallarta is lovely this time of year

Rise Chicano

Arise from the shadow of nothingness

arise from the neverending nada of servitude

The problem is that we live by other people’s words. 

We think we are, what they think we are.

Hollywood and sociologists have tried so hard to do us in. 

So rise and step out, from the long night of denial.

Chicano, dont let the ignorance of man command your conscious. 

Arise and tell your neighbor the news:

let the few become many.

Remember this: you are free to act, but you must act to be free.

So whats it gonna be?

Do we stand, or remind forever dead and dying?

The Latino population is growing fast and now accounts for one out of every six people.

  • Between 2000 and 2010, the number of people in the United States who identified themselves as Latino grew from 35.3 million to 50.5 million (an increase of 43%)
  • In 2010, Latinos comprised one-sixth (16.3%) of the total U.S. population—up from 12.5% in 2000

Nearly two-thirds of Latinos are native-born.

  • 62.9% of people who identified themselves as Latino were native-born in 2010

More than one-quarter of foreign-born Latinos are naturalized U.S. citizens, but roughly half are unauthorized immigrants.

  • 29.4% of foreign-born Latinos were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2010, meaning that they can vote {Figure 4}.
  • Roughly half of foreign-born Latinos were unauthorized immigrants in 2010.

Just under one-third of foreign-born Latinos speak English “very well” or better.

  • 31.6% of foreign-born Latinos age five and up reported speaking only English or speaking it “very well” in 2010 {Figure 5}.
  • 27.5% of foreign-born Latinos age five and up reported speaking English “very well” in 2010.
  • Another 4.1% of foreign-born Latinos age five and up reported speaking only English in 2010.

The states with the largest Latino population shares are New Mexico, California, and Texas, but the fastest growing Latino populations are in South Carolina, Alabama, and Tennessee.

  • As of 2010, Latinos comprised 46.3% of the population in New Mexico, 37.6% in California and Texas, 29.6% in Arizona, 26.5% in Nevada, 22.5% in Florida, and 20.7% in Colorado

Latinos in the United States are a diverse and fast-growing group that is amassing considerable economic and political power. As data from the 2010 Census and other sources demonstrate, Latinos now account for one-sixth of the U.S. population. Most Latinos were born in this country, but over one-third are immigrants. Latinos as a whole (both foreign-born and native-born) are sizeable shares of the population and electorate in New Mexico, California, and Texas, but the fastest growing Latino populations are in South Carolina, Alabama, and Tennessee. The Mexican population is by far the largest in size, but the number of Spaniards is increasing the fastest. Latinos work in a diverse range of occupations, and nearly half of Latino households are owner occupied. Latinos also wield significant economic clout. Latino businesses and consumers sustain millions of jobs and add hundreds of billions of dollars in value to the U.S. economy.

America’s Latino assets are not being used as they could to advance the nation’s interest. Better relations with our neighbors are possible. Latinos can lead the way.

well isn’t that the truth? 

The border fence that divides the Mexican people was born on February 2nd, 1848 with the signing of the Guadalupe Hidalgo treaty. A treaty that was never honored and restitution to this day has never been made. 
Did you know that in 1915 there were Chicano lynching?
"This land was Mexican once, was Indian always and is, and will be again."
This is my tierra natal. 
"I search for our essential dignity as a people, a people with a greater sense of purpose, to belong and contribute to something greater than our pueblo
I seek to recover and reshape my spiritual identity.”
A misinformed people is a subjugated people. 
I am in all cultures at the same time, alma entre dos mundos. 

The border fence that divides the Mexican people was born on February 2nd, 1848 with the signing of the Guadalupe Hidalgo treaty. A treaty that was never honored and restitution to this day has never been made. 

Did you know that in 1915 there were Chicano lynching?

"This land was Mexican once, was Indian always and is, and will be again."

This is my tierra natal. 

"I search for our essential dignity as a people, a people with a greater sense of purpose, to belong and contribute to something greater than our pueblo

I seek to recover and reshape my spiritual identity.”

A misinformed people is a subjugated people. 

I am in all cultures at the same time, alma entre dos mundos. 

 patriotism of the Latin American community.

"Instead of bitching about people singing this in another language, we should be thankful that people of Latin heritage have our fucking backs and are PROUD to be American just like anyone who speaks English.

Personally, if they sang this in Chinese or German, it would still make me proud to be an American.

Get the fuck over it and stop being a xenophobic douche bag. Just because you only speak English does not mean you love this country more than someone who doesn’t.”-Some dude off YouTube…

Interesting

Shakira at White House: “The only road out of poverty is education”

univisionnews:

Watch Shakira’s swearing-in speech on Thursday as part of President Obama’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. 

After the jump, read the full transcript of her speech, in which she stressed the importance of early childhood education for Latinos in the United States based on her 15 years experience working with children in Colombia and Latin America.

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